Chariho School Parents’ Forum

August 30, 2008

SAT rankings

Filed under: Student Performance — Editor @ 1:09 pm

Thanks to our friends at Anchorrising for compiling this spreadsheet. 

Public School SAT Scores by State Ranking

  Reading Math Writing Cumulative
Iowa 607 621 588 1816
Minnesota 599 610 579 1788
South Dakota 605 602 580 1787
Illinois 588 613 582 1783
Wisconsin 590 611 580 1781
Missouri 593 598 579 1770
North Dakota 592 607 566 1765
Michigan 579 602 570 1751
Kansas 582 593 566 1741
Utah 586 583 564 1733
Nebraska 577 583 563 1723
Tennessee 573 570 564 1707
Oklahoma 575 575 555 1705
Arkansas 575 570 559 1704
Colorado 566 577 555 1698
Kentucky 566 573 550 1689
Louisiana 568 567 553 1688
Wyoming 563 579 543 1685
Mississippi 569 550 559 1678
Alabama 562 558 551 1671
Montana 544 552 526 1622
New Mexico 545 536 524 1605
Idaho 539 541 515 1595
Ohio 529 543 514 1586
Washington 522 531 505 1558
Vermont 521 523 507 1551
Oregon 518 525 497 1540
Alaska 521 523 495 1539
Massachusetts 507 520 505 1532
Arizona 514 521 496 1531
New Hampshire 513 516 502 1531
Connecticut 503 507 506 1516
Virginia 508 510 496 1514
West Virginia 509 499 495 1503
California 494 513 493 1500
New Jersey 492 514 493 1499
North Carolina 492 511 478 1481
Maryland 490 498 490 1478
Indiana 492 505 477 1474
Nevada 495 504 474 1473
Pennsylvania 490 500 478 1468
Florida 492 495 475 1462
New York 484 503 475 1462
Texas 484 502 476 1462
Georgia 486 490 477 1453
South Carolina 484 496 471 1451
Rhode Island 483 487 479 1449
Delaware 482 483 471 1436
Maine 463 462 456 1381
Hawaii 456 473 441 1370
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13 Comments »

  1. FYI Chariho 2008 score – 1523.64

    Comment by Chariho parent #2 — September 2, 2008 @ 1:57 pm | Reply

  2. CP#2, is that something to be proud of considering that it ranks next to last for South County?

    SK-1602.7
    NK-1601.6
    EWG-1569 (highest increase in South County @ 23.9)
    NAR-1566.5
    CHA-1523.64
    WES-1487.6

    I wouldn’t go raising any flags on that score for Chariho, unless it was a surrender flag.

    Comment by CharihoParent — September 2, 2008 @ 3:31 pm | Reply

  3. No just adding more information presented.

    Comment by Chariho parent #2 — September 2, 2008 @ 7:06 pm | Reply

  4. And unless I am wrong, not every student takes the SAT, only the ones bound for a college track. So if every student did take the SAT, I would stake my next paycheck the scores would trend downward. So if we use the score as a measure, and measure the whole student body instead of the willing(college bound), then the results would indicate a situation wowrse than we currently see.

    Comment by RS — September 3, 2008 @ 12:17 pm | Reply

  5. RS, if a student plans on attending CCRI they are not required to take the SAT. My daughter, who is attending CCRI, didn’t take them. If she had been required to take them, I’m sure her math score would have lowered the reported numbers.

    Comment by CharihoParent — September 3, 2008 @ 1:25 pm | Reply

  6. The focus of education seems to be shifting away from reading,writing and math and towards multiculturalism,accepting homosexual lifestyles and”keeping kids safe”.

    Comment by george abbott — September 3, 2008 @ 3:12 pm | Reply

  7. My favorite is “Self Esteem”

    From the Washingon Post:
    “”According to the Washington think tank’s annual Brown Center report on education, 6 percent of Korean eighth-graders surveyed expressed confidence in their math skills, compared with 39 percent of U.S. eighth-graders. But a respected international math assessment showed Koreans scoring far ahead of their peers in the United States, raising questions about the importance of self-esteem.

    “”In Japan, the report found, 14 percent of math teachers surveyed said they aim to connect lessons to students’ lives, compared with 66 percent of U.S. math teachers. Yet the U.S. scores in eighth-grade math trail those of the Japanese, raising similar questions about the importance of practical relevance.

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/10/17/AR2006101701298.html

    Comment by Bill Felkner — September 3, 2008 @ 3:55 pm | Reply

  8. My son started at Rutgers this week. Before he even had one class they required two days of orientation where the subject matter was diversity and sex stuff. He asked if he could leave and they said nope. He went outside to make a phone call and never returned. He said to me that he was in college to take classes of HIS choice and to study to get good grades. My 7 year old daughter lectured the family about recycling. I asked her where she learned about recycling and found out they spend considerable time teaching recycling at Hope Valley school. I don’t have any major issues with recycling but please use our money teaching my kids math, science, and social studies. I’ll take care of the rest at no cost to anyone else.

    Comment by Jim L. — September 3, 2008 @ 4:26 pm | Reply

  9. The last 3 posts are rather ironic because these were things my wife and I discussed over the weekend. Schools at all levels need to go back to what they were intended to do and that is to teach. All the “social programs” need to be taught to the children by the parents. We need to get back to the basics, reading, wrting, arithmetic once these 3 mastered then students can tackle sciences, history and geography with ease and confidence.

    Comment by CharihoParent — September 3, 2008 @ 5:31 pm | Reply

  10. As an added bonus, if schools stop teaching values and offering social services, we’ll save a bundle. Imagine…children learning core subjects as much as the global competition and at greatly reduced cost so families will have more to spend at home. The socialists will never agree.

    Comment by Curious Resident — September 3, 2008 @ 6:59 pm | Reply

  11. CR, I can’t agree with you more on that one.

    Comment by CharihoParent — September 4, 2008 @ 4:43 am | Reply

  12. I’m moving to Iowa 🙂

    Comment by njwashor — October 2, 2008 @ 8:28 am | Reply

  13. It would be nice if it were that simple.

    Comment by RS — October 2, 2008 @ 3:05 pm | Reply


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